In the Beginning…

Before giving an overview of the feasts, we need to start at the beginning. From Genesis 1 through Revelation 22, there are patterns within patterns, word pictures, types, foreshadows and shadows. In the coming blog entries, we will have fun finding and studying many of these.

God of Order

God is a God of order (1 Corinthians 14:33; Psalms 119:133). God is a provider (Genesis 22:14). Note: The Psalms’ verse refers to the Hebrew word for “order” which is koon (כּוּןkūn) [h3559]. “God of order” means He is fixed or steadfast on a goal.

Other meanings of koon:

  1. Establishing a royal dynasty (2 Samuel 7:13; 1 Chronicles 17:12)
  2. Founding a city (Habakkuk 2:12)
  3. Creating the natural order (Deuteronomy 32:6; Psalms 8:3–4; Proverbs 8:27)
  4. Fashioning a people for oneself (2 Samuel 7:24)
  5. Adjusting weapons for targets (Psalms 7:12–13; 11:2)
  6. Appointing to an office (Joshua 4:4)
  7. Confirming a position (1 Kings 2:12)
  8. Making ready or preparing for use (2 Chronicles 31:11; Psalms 103:19; Zephaniah 1:7)
  9. Attaining certainty (Deuteronomy 13:14–15; 1 Samuel 23:23)

An Example of God’s Order

Genesis 1:1
In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

The Days of Creation:

First Day (Genesis 1:3–5):
Light – so there was light and darkness
Second Day (Genesis 1:6–8):
Sky and water – water separated
Third Day (Genesis 1:9–13):
Land and seas – water gathered
Vegetation
Fourth Day (Genesis 1:14–19):
Sun, moon, and stars – to govern the day and the night to mark seasons, days, and years
Fifth Day (Genesis 1:20–23):
Fish, and birds – to fill the waters and sky
Sixth Day (Genesis 1:24–31):
Animals – to fill the earth
Man and woman – to care for the earth and to commune with God
Seventh Day (Genesis 2:1–3):
God rested and declared all He had made to be very good.

Nugget: Notice in Genesis 1:3, God created tha light, not the darkness. Then He separated the light from the darkness. Acts 26:18 compares darkness to the power of satan and light to God. In John 1:4–5, Jesus is the light that shineth in the darkness.

The first four days provided for the fifth and sixth days. The third day provided vegetation (food) for fifth and sixth days. The third, fifth and first part of sixth days provided for man’s needs. God provided every need. But, how are the days of creation involved with the Feasts of the LORD in Leviticus 23? This, of course, will be shown throughout this blog. For starters, here is an example.

“Seven” is the biblical number for perfection and completion. Creation was in seven days. There are seven Feasts of the LORD. The feasts represent God’s prophetic calendar from the original Passover to Calvary and to the Kingdom to come. Not enough? Check out this nugget!

Holy Days

God made reference to His special holy days on the fourth day of creation in Genesis 1:14:

Genesis 1:14 (KJV)
And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years:

The Hebrew word moed (מוׄעֵדmôʼēd) [h4150] is translated into English as “seasons”. This word means a fixed, appointed time or seasons or place where God would meet with His people. It specifically refers to God’s appointed biblical holy days. Moed is the same word used to refer to the Feasts of the LORD in Leviticus 23:2,4. That’s amazing! It only gets better.

From Leviticus 23:4, the Hebrew word for a “holy convocation” or “sacred assembly” is mikrah (מִקְרָאmiqrā́) [h4744]. This word means a “dress rehearsal.” Through the festivals, the Hebrew people would act out a dress rehearsal.

The purposes for dress rehearsals:

  • Revealing the Messiah and
  • Learning the overall redemptive and prophetic plan of God.

For 1500 years the Hebrew people performed the drama of redemption as a picture pointing them to the person of Messiah Jesus. This observation is not a criticism. Because, their day of full restoration is coming soon.

That’s enough for this time Next the next post continues on with Genesis.

Until next time,

שָׁלוֹם (Shalom!)